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ReviewReprising The Master Of The Seas: The Omega Seamaster 300 Heritage Collection

The Omega Seamaster 300 upgrades make the iconic dive watch from 1957 fuse the brand’s past, present and future into cool and contemporary vintage-inspired timepieces that are just as relevant today

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Every now and then, watch brands with illustrious histories and vast archives revive their heritage successes, leaving enthusiasts with much to discuss when comparing modern-day interpretations with their vintage inspirations. Omega, especially, bring something new to the table with every renewed classic. The Seamaster 300 series, introduced in 1957 as part of a ‘master’ trilogy for the brand—Speedmaster, Seamaster and Railmaster—was the brand’s first ever dedicated dive watch. Reintroduced in 2021, the Seamaster 300 now features an actual 300m water-resistant case, sized at 41mm, a co-axial Master Chronometer-certified movement, and a vintage-inspired new look that makes the watch relevant once more. In 2023, as part of the collection’s 75th anniversary celebration, Omega released the Seamaster 300 timepiece with a gradient blue dial that darkens around the periphery. With minimal text on the ‘sandwich’ dial, and a 60-hour power reserve on the chronometer calibres, the Omega Seamaster 300 goes beyond just a revival timepiece.

Omega Seamaster 300 Summer Blue
Omega released the Seamaster 300 timepiece in 2023, with a gradient blue dial that darkens around the periphery. With minimal text on the ‘sandwich’ dial, and a 60-hour power reserve on the chronometer calibres, the Omega Seamaster 300 goes beyond just a revival timepiece

The 1957 Seamaster 300: Omega’s First Dive Watch With a Rotating Bezel

Technically, the first Omega Seamaster was a dress watch with water-resistant properties, released in 1948. Almost a decade later, the first Seamaster 300 was introduced, with a water resistance of 200m. At the time, 200m was the depth allowed by testing equipment, and while the actual resistance may have been more, there was no way to check and certify the watch for greater water resistance. Still, this Seamaster 300 was Omega’s first dedicated dive timer with a unidirectional-rotating diver’s bezel. On the 60th anniversary of the 1957 release, in 2017, the brand presented a limited edition of the master trio, all three almost identical to the originals.

Omega Seamaster 300 1957 Original
The first Seamaster 300 was introduced in 1957, with a water resistance of 200m, the brand’s first dedicated dive timer with a unidirectional-rotating diver’s bezel

The Return Of A Diving Icon: Seamaster 300

In 2021, the brand upped the size of the timepiece from 39mm to 41mm and re-released the watch as a throwback to the 1957 diver. The new steel case features brushed and satin finishes that lend the watch a contemporary aesthetic, and a domed sapphire crystal glass over the dial. Having retained all that was good and iconic about its predecessor, the redesigned Seamaster 300’s new DNA features enhancements like the co-axial Master Chronometer movement. The thickness of the bezel has been reduced to give the watch more dial room, and the dial itself has a new sandwich construction.

The Watch Guide

Having retained all that was good about its predecessor, the redesigned Seamaster 300’s new DNA features enhancements like the co-axial Master Chronometer movement

The Watch Guide

The thickness of the bezel has been reduced to give the watch more dial room, and the dial itself has a new sandwich construction

The Watch Guide

The crown on the redesigned Seamaster 300 is now signed with the Omega logo

The vintage-inspired beige lower layer of the dial is coated with Super-LumiNova that glows a bright blue on indexes and the hour hand, and green for the minutes hand and the 12 o’clock marker on the bezel, while a lollipop seconds hand adds a certain vitality to the watch. The second layer of the sandwich dial features cut-outs for triangular indexes and Arabic numerals at the cardinal points. Besides the brand name, logo, and the collection name, there is no other text on the dial. So much so, even the ‘co-axial master chronometer’ and depth resistance rating have been shifted to the caseback. Incidentally, the watch now has an official depth rating of 300m.

The Watch Guide

The sandwich dial on the Omega Seamaster 300 features cut-outs for triangular indexes and Arabic numerals at the cardinal points

The Watch Guide

The beige lower layer of the dial is coated with Super-LumiNova that glows a bright blue on indexes and the hour hand, and green for the minutes hand

A Metas-certified master co-axial calibre 8912 powers the watch. With a power reserve of 60 hours, a silicon balance spring that offers enhanced anti-magnetism, and increased shock-resistance, the automatic winding movement packs quite the punch. The decoration of the calibre is visible through the sapphire crystal window on the screwed-down caseback of the watch.

Seamaster 300 Update In Bronze-Gold

Omega’s Seamaster 300 series includes a case made from a special alloy of bronze and gold, with the addition of the elements palladium and silver. This unique alloy has corrosion-resistant and hypoallergenic properties that make it fit for diving as well as everyday use. Essentially, over time, this material will age more naturally, and not develop the greenish patina typical of bronze dive watches.

The Watch Guide
The Omega Seamaster 300 in a bronze-gold case. This unique alloy has corrosion-resistant and hypoallergenic properties that make it fit for diving as well as everyday use. Essentially, over time, this material will age more naturally, and not develop the greenish patina typical of bronze dive watches

A brown ceramic insert stands out against the bronze-gold of the case and bezel. Matching this is the multi-layer dial in a deep, rich, brown, created by oxidising a commonly used bronze alloy (CuSn8). Recessed markers in gold, and gold PVD treatment on the hands complete the two-tone aesthetic of the watch. On this timepiece, the lollipop seconds hand has been replaced with an arrowhead, perhaps to give the watch a dressier look.

Seamaster 300 Set In Stone And Precious Metals

Two years prior to the 2021 update, the brand released four references of the Seamaster 300 in platinum-gold and 18-karat yellow gold cases. The dials on these watches were made from semi-precious mineral lapis lazuli, which has a distinct rich blue hue, and malachite, a green stone with natural ‘waves’ in shades of green and yellow. Here, too, the seconds hand is tipped with an arrowhead filled with lume. These watches are powered by the Metas-certified automatic calibre 8913, with a power reserve of 60 hours.

The Watch Guide

In 2019, Omega released four references of the Seamaster 300 in platinum-gold and 18-karat yellow gold cases. Seen here is the platinum case with a lapis lazuli dial

The Watch Guide

The yellow gold watch with a dial made from malachite

The Watch Guide

These watches featured applied markers and numerals and a ceramic insert on the bezel ring

The Watch Guide

The seconds hand has an arrowhead tip to give the watch a more formal aesthetic

The Watch Guide

The malachite dial of the Semaster 300 in yellow gold. Malachite is a green stone with natural ‘waves’ in shades of green and yellow

The Omega Semaster universe has grown dramatically over the years. Still, the Seamaster 300 collection lives up to its legacy and holds its ground as a functional and practical dive watch that is still just as relevant if not more beautiful than its predecessors. All these are practical upgrades, rather than changes for the sake of change. Then again, given Omega’s history, any change they’ve made has been well thought-out, and the execution even better.

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